Episode 46: Jessie Yeoh (Nostalgia Box Video Game Museum), casualisation of games & early access expectations

You might have a big collection of games but nothing like what Jessie Yeoh has acumulated, which prompted her to open the Nostalgia Box Perth's first Video Game Museum.
Sep 8, 2016

It’s well known that the average age of gamers is rising every year (or sometimes going backwards). With audience tastes changing, does this have an impact on the way games are made? With more adults joining in on the realm of gaming and more gamers growing up and entering full time work there isn’t always time to sink into an MMO character or schedule a six-man raid. While hardcore players may cry foul at the way game play is being designed, do their views represent everyone, or are they in the minority?

 

For older gamers, a big part of the gaming experience can be revisiting the games you played as a kid. Jessie Yeoh is the owner of Perth’s own video game console museum The Nostalgia Box, and she shared her experiences collecting consoles, and doing the research needed to amass a collection big enough to open a museum.

Early access delivery has become one of the most popular tools for indie developers to release their game while bringing in some funds to keep the project going. Gamers benefit as well by getting new games at a discounted price. Recently developers of Ark: Survival Evolved have been accused of mishandling the expectations that their playershave, by release downloadable content for their game, before it hits release. With the lines shifting between what is finished, and what is a work in progress, can we be certain of any label that applies to games?